Category 'Art'

For me every new year is a chance for reinvention so with 2017 on the horizon I have been going through a period of deep self -reflection. 2015 was the year I became an artist and I built a portfolio of 40 pieces that I’m very proud of. 2016 was the year I spent most of my time on marketing that body of work and as a result I only created 12 pieces. It has been a year of highs and lows; a year where I started to make money and gain recognition for my work but also, somehow, had no time to create art. [gallery size="medium" link="none" ids="2841,2869,2933"]   I’ve learnt so much about the art world—mainly that art is consumed differently from its hey-day in the 80s and yet it’s still trying to operate on an antiquated gallery-focused model. I’ve learnt that the art world, particularly in Australia, is divided between traditional and subversive and my work doesn’t fit into either box. My exhibition at the Hub Gallery, Caboolture The Internet has given artists the opportunity for wider reach but it’s also flooded with competition so I’ve spent the majority of my year learning about arts marketing and implementing different strategies with limited success. I’ve seen so many fellow artists become marketers and educators – setting up online courses, mastering email marketing funnels, trying to make their work go viral – all in the hope that they’ll begin to make serious money from their art but in the process they lose the essence of what it is to make art. I don’t want this to happen to me. I signed up to be an artist, not a teacher, not a marketer. So I’ve decided to stop buying into all this arts marketing crap and getting caught in the nets of people trying to capitalise on artists and instead focus on the things that make my heart sing. The one useful thing I’ve learned is to picture exactly what I want my life and my business to look like and then work towards that goal every day. This may surprise you but my ultimate goal is to travel and either get paid to do it or live off a passive income. In fact this line has been in my bio since day 1: “My dream is to travel around Australia creating photographic art in rural and iconic locations.” While I have been taking baby steps towards this goal, mainly through my travel Instagram account (@hayleyrtravels), it’s unlikely anyone looking at my art would even know this about me. That’s why in 2017 I want to launch something new. My four passions are photography, travel, art and writing, in that order, and so I’m trying to create something that combines all four. I don’t know exactly what it will look like and the experimentation process has been really hard because it’s a whole new way of thinking and working, and I’m the kind of person who gets frustrated if I’m not good at something right away. It feels weird to be back at the drawing board but I know if I keep at it something will come together eventually. The things I am working towards are:

  • Travelling more
  • Writing a blog about each place I travel to
  • Creating a photo essay documenting my travels so I can pursue more landscape work
  • Making art pieces created out of photographs I’ve taken in those locations
The road to Mt Cook As I learnt from my 2015 Exposing Illusions project I am a better artist when I have a project. So this new project will involve art pieces inspired by travel. I intend to create much more simply, art that takes hours instead of weeks, because I long for the wilderness and need to stop spending so much time at a computer. I plan to sell prints and products made from my work using an online distributor at a price everyone can afford in the hope that these sales will fund future travel. I will also sell limited edition feature prints created by a professional printer at a higher, more collectible, price point. I will market this work to commercial, travel and stock agencies in the hope they see value in what I do. Naturally this all terrifies me. Deep down I’m convinced that I will only ever be mediocre no matter how hard I try. But I need to try regardless. For now I ask for your patience while I create this project and your assistance to help me fine-tune it. I’d like you to be my test audience and will ask for your honest feedback on various components. I’d love for you to be my champions, helping me get the word out about this project. I know that it will be a long journey to my end goal but I’m excited about all the things I will learn on the way. Come for a ride?

On Thursday 1 October I exhibited my work for the very first time at RAW Brisbane's MERGE showcase. After months of planning, buying things for my display and organising prints it was wonderful to finally have everything come together. There was a great response to my work with lots of positive feedback and people spent a long time looking at and discussing all my prints. A few artists expressed an interest in collaborating - one guy was so keen he gave me his daughter's business card twice! I am really grateful to all my friends and family who came along for support. I had a fun night and I couldn't have done it without you all! Congratulations to all my fellow artists on a successful night. If you're considering having a RAW exhibition of your own, they hold showcases worldwide and it's a fantastic experience I'd recommend to all artists. Photos courtesy of Noel Roberts and Elliot Tonks of Live Exposure. [gallery columns="4" size="large" link="file" ids="2484,2488,2489,2485,2486,2487,2496,2490,2491,2493,2494,2497,2498,2500,2501,2502,2499,2504,2492,2503"]  

Over the coming weeks I will begin to explore the tricks and techniques used by the best photographers but rather than just saying “hey, here’s how to shoot an HDR image” I want to photograph these techniques in the style that I love to shoot. Every pro photographer specialises in a certain kind of photography and I want to talk about why it’s so important to define your niche and explain how I eventually stumbled across mine. When your passion for photography first ignites you’ll want to shoot everything in sight. Every flower, every sunset, every local event. You’ll find excuses to go places just so you can take your camera and begrudge going to events where cameras aren’t allowed. I was stuck in this snap happy wonderland for about three years before I started to consider making money from my hobby. But to be able to market yourself as a photographer you need to have a specialty. At first I thought this was ludicrous. Surely the fact that I can and do shoot everything makes me a better prospect for every photography job ever. But the more I thought about it the more I realised why this doesn’t make sense. If someone wants a children’s portrait, then they want to employ someone who shoots children’s portraits because that person will know exactly how to put children at ease in front of a camera. They don’t want someone who sometimes shoots kid’s portraits but also shoots food photography and sports because they’ll look at your website and won’t understand what they’re getting. (Unless you specifically shoot children eating food at sports games and then you have a specialty—even if it’s a creepy one). If, however, someone only shoots macro fungi then whenever a company is looking for a well-shot mushroom they’re going to save themselves time and employ the person who lives to shoot that subject and knows where the best mushrooms are and the best light to shoot them in, like THIS GUY, and not the guy who shot a mushroom once. And this is why it pays to specialise. Not just in photography, but in whatever your chosen profession is. It limits your competition and allows you to perfect your niche and be the best at what you do. I really struggled to define what it is I wanted to shoot. Whenever I tell someone I’m a photographer most people assume I shoot weddings and portraits because that’s what photography means to them and that’s traditionally where the dollars are. And for awhile I too pictured myself as a wedding photographer because it was the only field I knew I could make money from right away. But deep down I didn’t want to be a wedding photographer and I didn’t want to take family portraits. What I did like to shoot was landscapes and wildlife, but how do you make money out of those? Especially when there’s already so many people doing it better? Then one day on CreativeLIVE I saw an ad for a course on how to turn photographs into works of art and decided to tune in because the concept intrigued me. After watching Brooke Shaden’s class for a couple of hours I knew that THIS is what I wanted to do with every fibre of my being and I bought the course without hesitation in what became one of those life-defining moments. I would be a conceptual fine art portraitist. A WHAT? Well, normally when a portrait is taken it is commissioned by a person, family or company with the intent to showcase the subject’s beauty or professionalism. Conceptual fine art portraits on the other hand are created as an art form. Instead of smiling, candid subjects these portraits aim to tell imaginative stories through the use of costumes, props and posing. They are experimental in nature and in many circumstances utilise in-camera tricks or post processing to add an element of magic or the unreal, and it’s mainly these kinds of techniques I will explore throughout this blog. Conceptual fine art portraiture is a broad field so it’s incredibly hard to describe but as a picture paints a thousand words, here are some examples from a few of my favourite photographers. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="238"]Away with the canaries 'Away with the canaries' by Miss Aniela[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignright" width="200"]to serve 'To serve' by Brooke Shaden[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="253"]Set them free 'Set them free' by Erik Johansson[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignright" width="200"]These Are The Creatures In My Neighborhood 'These are the creatures in my neighbourhood' by Joel Robison[/caption]                           I was drawn to this field instinctually but over time I’ve asked myself why that might be. A few years back I would have told you I didn’t have a creative bone in my body but I’ve always loved the arts so have gravitated to jobs in this area. I can’t draw or play an instrument. I tried creative writing but it felt like drowning. I’ve since learnt that creativity is so much more than being able to dream up and make pretty things. It’s not a skill gifted at birth and it’s actually surprisingly easy to train yourself to be receptive to creativity when you find the medium that allows you to express it best. I now come up with at least three concepts for photos a day, whereas before, I was hard pressed to imagine ANYTHING. I’m also a perfectionist so being able to refine one concept is immensely appealing to me, whereas if I take a trip and shoot 3,000 photos, that’s an overwhelming amount of work for me and is the primary reason why most of my photos remain unseen. But most of all I’m a huge fan of magical realism, where elements of a magical world seep into our own and are presented in a way that makes it seem entirely normal. This idea is thrilling to me and conceptual fine art photography has given me the medium to express my fascination with this concept and a way to add magic to my everyday. So in defining your photography niche it pays to analyse your strengths and interests until you find a field that fits. If you’re really stuck this article succinctly wraps up some points that may help you define yours. But above all you need to love what you do because to succeed at something you need to pursue it doggedly and if your heart isn’t in it you’re destined to fail. Defining who you are is important because it gives your photographs intent, which makes them powerful. Good photographs have a clear subject, whatever it may be, and they tell a story about that subject. Sadly, choosing your field is not the end. Then the world expects you to have a personal style! Something about your work that is instantly recognisable and sets you apart from everyone else. Usually style comes naturally with experimentation. Mine is currently a work in progress but I know I like dark autumn colours, muted blacks, foreground interest, painterly techniques and cinematic lighting, and am sure these will manifest in my work, but for now this is still part of my journey. Discovering what you love to do is the fun part. Enjoy it! But if you’re a hobby photographer who loves taking photos for the sake of taking photos then that’s just fine too. Let me know how you discovered what you love to shoot!

How often have you looked at a photo and thought, ‘how did they do that?’ Among a sea of selfies and food shots some photographs are so intriguing or beautiful that they demand your attention and make you wonder. But what might be a fleeting interest for some, for me is an obsession. I don’t usually pull things apart to see how they tick but knowing the tricks the great photographers use enhances the magic for me rather than ruining it. And after years of studying these techniques I want to share them with you so that you too can appreciate the process of creation and not just the end product. And so the ‘Exposing Illusions’ blog will see me attempt, and no doubt sometimes fail, to reproduce a photography technique each week. My journey with photography began in high school where I spent a semester studying black and white photography before quickly realising that spending time in a stuffy dark room with a bunch of unpredictable chemicals wasn’t my idea of a good time (nightclubs excluded). Besides, back then I was more a video girl, all colour and movement, a clunky VHS video camera glued to my shoulder which eventually led to a passionate but brief career as a video editor (and probably all this back pain). When digital photography came along I was gifted a point and shoot and proceeded to point it and shoot snaps of every willing subject. It was then that I discovered I had an eye for the vaguely interesting and this, really, is the essence of good photography - immortalising the interesting. Now I’m the kind of person who struggles to be good at anything because I’m too impatient and if I can’t be good right away then what’s the damn use in trying. And if you’re one of these people too, I suggest you pick up a camera because cameras today are clever enough to do the hard stuff for you, which you’re not going to get from a painting or an  instrument. All you need is an eye for composition and the ability to press a button and hey presto! you can trick your brain into thinking you’re already good at something and then it’s only natural to want to improve. [caption id="attachment_1417" align="alignright" width="300"]Morocco The first ever photo I took with a digital camera in 2006.[/caption] When my dad outgrew his first DSLR it became mine (cue heavenly music) and like many I was content for awhile to use my camera on full automatic mode. Even though some photographers would disagree, I believe that using your camera, whatever it may be, in auto mode is an important step in learning to hone your vision without getting weighed down by the technicality of your camera. Honestly, my non-technical brain screamed in pain every time I made efforts to understand the exposure triangle or depth of field and these concepts rattled around in my brain for years before they eventually clicked and made sense. If I’d had to understand these concepts before I ever picked up a camera than I would have given away this photography lark eons ago. Most people are content to stay in auto and that’s perfectly fine for documenting personal events and pretty scenes but I started to get REALLY annoyed by blur and poor focus and so I put myself in the hands of the professionals and took a couple of half day beginner photography classes to learn how to control my camera manually and it was then that I became utterly hooked.Hayley Roberts head shot photo If this were a film, it’d be here you’d see the montage – me pouring over every photography book and magazine I could get my hands on, trooping around the backyard shooting everything in sight, pages flying off the calendar as I scoured the Internet and YouTube for anything vaguely photography related, crying over my bank balance when I see how much I’ve spent on photography gear (that point and shoot is a gateway drug – you’ve been warned), ending in me staring at a blank Word document wondering how to put all this passion into words. I’ve shot it all - weddings, portraits, events, landscapes, bands, wildlife, macro, travel, street - and 95% of my photos have never been seen by another human because I’m too much of a perfectionist to share them. [gallery columns="5" link="file" ids="1418,1419,1420,1421,1422"]   But it’s conceptual photography—the art of using models and props and lighting and Photoshop—that truly thrills me because it’s no longer enough for me to merely document; I want to create, and make magic a reality, even if just in photographic form. Each week I hope to get better and wiser and pass on what I’ve learnt to you, so I can give back to the community that’s taught me so much. And, if nothing else, I learn by making mistakes so this could potentially be a very amusing experiment. And thus, the ‘Exposing Illusions’ blog is born. *cut the red ribbon – cue applause* Are you ready to peek behind the curtain?

4
Dec

Flying dreams

For me every new year is a chance for reinvention so with 2017 on the horizon I have been going through a period of deep self -reflection. 2015 was the year I became an artist and I built a portfolio of 40 pieces that I’m very proud of. 2016 was the year I spent most […]

11
Oct

RAW Brisbane Showcase – the show goes on!

On Thursday 1 October I exhibited my work for the very first time at RAW Brisbane’s MERGE showcase. After months of planning, buying things for my display and organising prints it was wonderful to finally have everything come together. There was a great response to my work with lots of positive feedback and people spent […]

15
Feb

What type of photographer are you? Discovering your style.

Over the coming weeks I will begin to explore the tricks and techniques used by the best photographers but rather than just saying “hey, here’s how to shoot an HDR image” I want to photograph these techniques in the style that I love to shoot. Every pro photographer specialises in a certain kind of photography […]

1
Feb

Welcome to Exposing Illusions

How often have you looked at a photo and thought, ‘how did they do that?’ Among a sea of selfies and food shots some photographs are so intriguing or beautiful that they demand your attention and make you wonder. But what might be a fleeting interest for some, for me is an obsession. I don’t […]